Black and white

During the winter, the colours turn more monochrome and many pictures also turn slight blue due to the snow reflecting the sky. Many cameras reads this wrong and end up setting the colours profile to cold.

One way to avoid this is to adjust the profile in your camera manually. An other way is to set the camera in black and white settings. If you have a mirrorless your electronic viewfinder will be black and white as well.

I’ve taken this to a new level by converting one of my cameras to infrared. I’ll give some more details of the actual work involved in a later post. Infrared is a light that the human eye don’t see. The image sensor of a camera is normally filtered to not see this light, but with a little surgery the camera can convert this light to something visible to the human eye. The result is a deep black and white image with a lot of contrasts and some unexpected contrasts.

The moon

One morning I was out with my dog and fortunately I brought my camera. As the moon was dipping the horizon and the sun was on its way up, the mist also arose from the close by river. All together it was a magical morning.

The morning can be quite challenging to capture. Especially when parts of the scene is lit. My camera got a in body stabilisation and paired with the right lens with stabilisation it really helps on low light scenes like these. If you don’t have a camera with these features you could use a tripod. These images are captured at 1/40s, f/8 and ISO400.

Cold winter

Cold winter at the Orkla river

The weather has been nice for a long time now. Crystal clear nights and some clouds in the horizon during the day. But since the days here up north are pretty short (only 6 hours at the time of writing this post) the temperatures will be creeping downwards. Right now it has stabilised at approximately -18C.

I went out to the local river and the breeze that comes together with the water flowing is extreme. The last rays of sun had just faded and the blue hour started. Mist arose from the river and created a magical, but cold, moment.

During these hours you might be able to catch something special.

Bird photography

It’s been a while now, but I thought you might wanted to see a bit of my latest project. When I swapped out my Canon gear for the new Fuji, one of the lenses I was most exited to get my hands on was the 100-400, witch on a Fuji X-mount equals about 150-600mm.

My first experiment was small birds on a bird feeder. I made one from old branches that were cut of a fallen tree. I wanted to have a natural background so I installed the feeder in my back yard.

Sitting on a little chair in the back yard waiting is a game in it self. It really takes patience, but the birds eventually showed up.

Sunset in the woods

Norway is still affected by Corvid-19 and it is strongly advisable to stay at home or close to your home. Since we live on the countryside its possible to move around a bit, but not too far. My family live in a valley called Orkdal and the hills surrounding this valley is mostly covered in forest and farmland. One evening I was out biking and I came across this beautiful little area with some old trees and rocks. I always bring a camera with me, but my M100 was not capable of capturing all details in those trees.

A couple of days later I went up there again with my big camera (Canon 5Ds) and my 24-70mm lens. I’m really pleased with the result.

Greenland 2016

Back in 2016 I went on an expedition across the Greenlandic Icecap in a group of 11 people. I will remember this for as long as I live and luckily I have som fantastic images from the expedition as well.

Into the woods

Now a days one have time to digg trough the photo library for old hidden treasures. I found this piece from the woods.

I’m not quite sure where its taken, but I believe its shot south west in Norway at a place called Urdådalen. It has a remarkable good quality given that its taken by a Canon 350D back in 2009.

Urdådalen

Framing that snowy landscape

Have you ever been photographing snowy landscapes just to realize that your camera made a blue gray looking out of focus image?

The camera operates with something called while balance and there is your first problem. The camera does a best guess when it comes to picking the color temperature.

Moving away from AWB (Auto White Balance) and over to a more representative choice could solve your first problem. A much better choice would be to also shoot in raw. Raw makes it possible to adjust the white balance in post processing. I’m always shooting Raw. The single reason is to keep all the colors.

By keeping more of those colors you will also be able to reveal some more details in under/over exposed images. That often happen because the snow will reflect light and confuse your light meter.

The next issue is the out of focus problem. There might be condensation on your lens so check that when you are out photographing.

The other, and more common, issue is contrast. The camera needs contrast objects to detect focus. So find your self a color change in your image to help that autofocus.

If you are using the camera on a tripod then use your live view and focus with manual focus and magnification. The process takes a bit longer but done properly the results are always better.

Low contrast snowy landscape on Greenland