Black and white

During the winter, the colours turn more monochrome and many pictures also turn slight blue due to the snow reflecting the sky. Many cameras reads this wrong and end up setting the colours profile to cold.

One way to avoid this is to adjust the profile in your camera manually. An other way is to set the camera in black and white settings. If you have a mirrorless your electronic viewfinder will be black and white as well.

I’ve taken this to a new level by converting one of my cameras to infrared. I’ll give some more details of the actual work involved in a later post. Infrared is a light that the human eye don’t see. The image sensor of a camera is normally filtered to not see this light, but with a little surgery the camera can convert this light to something visible to the human eye. The result is a deep black and white image with a lot of contrasts and some unexpected contrasts.

Into the woods

Now a days one have time to digg trough the photo library for old hidden treasures. I found this piece from the woods.

I’m not quite sure where its taken, but I believe its shot south west in Norway at a place called Urdådalen. It has a remarkable good quality given that its taken by a Canon 350D back in 2009.

Urdådalen